Central Ostrobothnia Chamber Orchestra
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Central Ostrobothnia Chamber Orchestra

FAQs

Instructions for the audience during the covid-19 pandemy

Safely in concerts during covid-time

1. Please do not come to concert if you feel ill – you may swop your ticket to another concert in the case of illness.
2. Please disinfect your hands while entering the Concert Hall.
3. You can bring your jacket with you into the Hall.
4. It is strongly recommended to wear a face mask in the area of Central Ostrobothnia. PLEASE USE A FACE MASK OR VIZIER WHILE IN CONCERT.
5. According to current restrictions 20 persons are allowed in the audience. We have no seating number in the Hall at the moment. 
6. In most of the concerts the pre-concert talk is shown on the screen in the Hall at 6.30 pm –we therefore kindly ask you to go to your seat as quietly as possible.
7. During the short interval (usually 10 min.) a second part of the pre-concert talk is shown in some of the concerts. The audience is kindly asked to stay in its seats if possible.
8. Please do notice, that the concert also is shown via the Orchestra’s YouTube channel as a live stream.
9. We kindly ask you to keep a safety distance of at least 2 m to others in every situation.
10. Please note that the door between the musicians foyer & audience foyer is locked for safety reasons. Please do not enter the musicians foyer after the concert either.
11. Thank you and enjoy the concert!

(Updated in March 2021)

 


Frequently asked questions

Should I go to a concert?

Yes! A recorded performance never varies, however good and gripping it may be. But a live concert is a unique experience, and you will never hear the same works performed twice in exactly the same way. A live concert is voyage of discovery.

But I don’t understand classical…

You don’t need to “understand” classical music in order to enjoy it. It’s enough to have an open, receptive mind free of preconceived ideas. Classical music is, what is more, easy to understand compared with other arts: just sit back and close your eyes (though you can of course keep them open if you prefer), and let the music carry you along.

I’m afraid I’ll clap in the wrong places…

Your ticket entitles you to a free programme stating the pieces to be played and their movements if they have more than one. As a rule, you don’t clap until the whole work has been performed, and the surest sign of this is when the conductor nods to the orchestra. Sometimes, the keenest listeners may clap between movements, and that’s not a catastrophe. If you’re not sure, wait until others start to applaud.

Do I need to dress up?

Not unless you want to. Younger people, especially, often come to concerts in jeans and sweaters and don’t look at all out of place. True, many folk still like to dress up a bit for a concert, but all in all: come as you like.

What else?

Please consider the people around you who may be suffering from asthma or some allergy by not wearing perfume or aftershave. In a hall with good acoustics, coughing fits and even individual coughs can be heard as far away as the platform, so please have some cough pastilles handy. But if you get taken by surprise, muffle the sound by coughing into a handkerchief.

Now, in these COVID times particularly, please don’t come to a concert if you’ve got a cold or flu. This way we can help prevent all kinds of bugs from spreading.

Make sure your mobile (cell) phone is switched off, or at least in silent mode throughout the concert. Photos, video and audio recordings are not allowed during the concert.

Where can I buy a ticket?

The easy way nowadays is online, and often easier than at the door.

A ticket bought online costs the same as at the door, but if you buy online, you can choose your seat in advance from the map of the auditorium. There is often a queue at the door, and you may not always be able to choose your seat.

Click here to see where you can buy a ticket, prices, and any concessions.

Do I have to pay for a programme?

No, a programme is so far free with each ticket. You can pick one up at the hall, either at the ticket desk or at the door.

Please note that there is a cloakroom charge at the Snellman Hall. The money goes to support the local associations that take it in turns to do cloakroom duty.